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Discover the energy source LNG

Liquefied natural gas for a more independent energy supply

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What is Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)?

LNG, the abbreviation that is currently on everyone’s lips, stands for liquefied natural gas. The name is a good clue to what LNG is all about. It is the liquid form of natural gas. To reach a liquid state, the natural gas is cooled down to about minus 160 degrees Celsius (-160 °C). It then only occupies a minimal fraction of the volume of gaseous natural gas – about one six-hundredth, to be precise.

This allows it to be transported in large volumes over long distances. LNG is transported in large tankers which store the LNG in isolated tanks.

What is Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)? | RWE

Once it arrives at the destination port, the primary energy source can either be stored or fed directly into existing gas pipelines. Compared to other conventional primary energy sources, gas causes less damage to the environment. Less carbon dioxide is emitted when it is burned than with other fuels such as hard coal.

Strengthened security of supply in Germany

Global market development in production and delivery

RWE also uses the primary energy source LNG and is involved in large-scale projects such as the construction of an LNG terminal in Brunsbüttel. RWE has also chartered special ships on behalf of the German government that can be used to import liquefied natural gas and feed it directly into the German gas network. In doing so, the company is helping the German government to strengthen security of supply in Germany in the near term and to move away from one-sided energy dependence as quickly as possible.

It will be possible to replace a portion of Russian gas from next year onwards. RWE also trades and imports LNG. Talks were recently started with the American company Sempra Infrastructure with a view to establishing another partnership.

Germany is currently evolving into a key market for liquefied natural gas, which is procured from different regions of the world in order to diversify the sources of gas supply. Besides the USA, Qatar and Australia are key LNG producers and suppliers.


Helping to create a net-zero future

RWE is supporting the EU in its efforts to reach its climate protection goals and is planning the conversion of the LNG terminals to be built for green hydrogen from the outset so that they can be retrofitted in the future.

Part of the project involves constructing a terminal for the import of green ammonia, which will be located in the immediate vicinity of the LNG terminal in Brunsbüttel. This will simplify the process of converting the entire site to green molecules at a later date.

Helping to create a net-zero future | LNG at RWE

An overview of our LNG projects

LNG – Floating Storage

Floating LNG terminals for the German energy supply.

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Elbehafen LNG project

Mooring for floating LNG terminal at Brunsbüttel site.

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RWE at the Brunsbüttel location

New flagship projects for LNG and hydrogen.

More about the location
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